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EU automakers propose 20% CO2 reduction for passenger cars by 2030

ABR Staff Writer Published 14 September 2017

The European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA) has proposed a 20% CO2 reduction for passenger cars by 2030, compared to 2021, and said the target should be conditional on the real market uptake of electrically-chargeable vehicles.

The new proposals were announced at the Frankfurt Motor Show (IAA) in Germany.

The association also stated that the availability of charging infrastructure can play a crucial role in achieving any significant CO2 reductions beyond 2020 levels.

Based on a mid-term review, which will be conducted in 2025, the target could be adopted either upwards or downwards.

ACEA president Dieter Zetsche said: “This is a steep reduction. It’s also in line with what is expected of other industry sectors, as well as the EU Climate and Energy Framework and the global Paris agreement.”

Zetsche continued saying: “In our opinion, this conditionality principle links Europe’s long-term climate objectives to the reality of the market.

“Currently the reality is that the market uptake of electrically-chargeable vehicles is low – and this is not due to lack of availability and choice.”

ACEA claims that in the first half of this year, electric vehicles made up 1.2% of the total new car sales in Europe. ACEA also stated that all its members are making significant investment in alternative powertrains and it is equally important that EU member states must also deliver their commitments to invest on the necessary recharging and refuelling infrastructure.

Zetsche said: “Our industry is committed to being part of the solution when it comes to decarbonising road transport, while at the same time reducing pollutant emissions.”

The automotive industry has come under criticism, after Volkswagen’s dieselgate scandal had come to light in 2015. European Commission has sought tougher control on the auto industry’s emissions.

Reuters noted that the European Commission could bring out a proposal for new CO2 standards for cars and vans for beyond 2020 to achieve the overall goal of cutting greenhouse gas emissions by at least 40% below the levels of 1990 by 2030.

A further 20% cut proposed by ACEA could help in reducing average CO2 emission goals by 76g per kilometre.


Image: ACEA proposes new CO2 cuts from the auto industry. Photo: Courtesy of Ruben de Rijcke/Wikipedia.